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joncarling:

wolf orobus
Apr 27, 2014 / 909 notes
Apr 27, 2014 / 211 notes
comicsalliance:

COMIXOLOGY’S NEW iOS APP REMOVES IN-APP STOREFRONT, SHIFTS APPLE CUSTOMERS TO WEB STORE
By Andy Khouri
Digital comics retailer ComiXology announced on Saturday that it was “retiring” its existing iOS applications for iPhone and iPad and replacing them with a new version that does not include the ability to make in-app purchases, one of the platform’s most signature and popular features. The iOS app’s storefront is simply gone, leaving only a reader app in its place. Going forward, iOS users will have to pursue the less direct path of buying their digital comics from ComiXology’s Web interface and later syncing them to their devices using the new app. This process circumvents Apple — whose iTunes App Store takes 30% of all in-app purchases from all vendors in the IOS marketplace — and thereby presumably frees up more profit for comic book publishers and/or comic book creators.
Presently, ComiXology’s branded iOS apps for DC, Marvel, Image and IDW are working as they have been. The Android app has also been updated, and users can make in-app purchases with a new integrated storefront instead of through Google Play.
The news comes just a couple of weeks after ComiXology and Apple rival Amazon.com announced that the latter was acquiring the former, and the new iOS process resembles that which Amazon’s Kindle customers have followed to use those products on Apple devices.

READ ANDY’S ANALYSIS
Apr 27, 2014 / 66 notes

comicsalliance:

COMIXOLOGY’S NEW iOS APP REMOVES IN-APP STOREFRONT, SHIFTS APPLE CUSTOMERS TO WEB STORE

By Andy Khouri

Digital comics retailer ComiXology announced on Saturday that it was “retiring” its existing iOS applications for iPhone and iPad and replacing them with a new version that does not include the ability to make in-app purchases, one of the platform’s most signature and popular features. The iOS app’s storefront is simply gone, leaving only a reader app in its place. Going forward, iOS users will have to pursue the less direct path of buying their digital comics from ComiXology’s Web interface and later syncing them to their devices using the new app. This process circumvents Apple — whose iTunes App Store takes 30% of all in-app purchases from all vendors in the IOS marketplace — and thereby presumably frees up more profit for comic book publishers and/or comic book creators.

Presently, ComiXology’s branded iOS apps for DC, Marvel, Image and IDW are working as they have been. The Android app has also been updated, and users can make in-app purchases with a new integrated storefront instead of through Google Play.

The news comes just a couple of weeks after ComiXology and Apple rival Amazon.com announced that the latter was acquiring the former, and the new iOS process resembles that which Amazon’s Kindle customers have followed to use those products on Apple devices.

READ ANDY’S ANALYSIS

Apr 27, 2014 / 6,195 notes

solomonorsalamander:

Fists of Fury, 1972; Dir: Lo Wei.

(via kingsleyvintage)

Apr 24, 2014 / 26,976 notes
nevver:

Starbridge
Apr 13, 2014 / 4,054 notes
Marvel’s Superheroes are Super Selfie-Absorbed
Apr 13, 2014
Animals Take Over the Paris Metro in Enchanting Photo Series
Apr 13, 2014
Mar 30, 2014 / 17,221 notes
Reading the Global Threat Intelligence Report (GTIR) | Security Affairs
Key findings in the 2014 GTIR include:
Cost for a ‘minor’ SQL injection attack exceeds $196,000 
Anti-virus fails to detect 54 per cent of new malware collected by honeypots 
43 per cent of incident response engagements were the result of malware 
Botnet activity takes an overwhelming lead at 34 percent of events observed - Almost 50 per cent of botnet activity detected in 2013 originated from US based addresses. 
Healthcare has observed a 13 per cent increase in botnet activity - Due to increased reliance on interconnected systems for the exchange and monitoring of health related data, more systems are potentially affected by malware.
Mar 29, 2014

Reading the Global Threat Intelligence Report (GTIR) | Security Affairs

Key findings in the 2014 GTIR include:

  • Cost for a ‘minor’ SQL injection attack exceeds $196,000 
  • Anti-virus fails to detect 54 per cent of new malware collected by honeypots 
  • 43 per cent of incident response engagements were the result of malware 
  • Botnet activity takes an overwhelming lead at 34 percent of events observed - Almost 50 per cent of botnet activity detected in 2013 originated from US based addresses. 
  • Healthcare has observed a 13 per cent increase in botnet activity - Due to increased reliance on interconnected systems for the exchange and monitoring of health related data, more systems are potentially affected by malware.